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Winter Storm Lorraine brings snow and wind to the northeast

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  • Winter Storm Lorraine will spread across the Northeast Monday night into Tuesday.
  • There will be a lot of snow and strong winds in the Northeast.
  • The Boston, Hartford and New York City metropolitan areas will all be affected by the snowfall.

Winter Storm Lorraine is becoming a nor’easter storm as it brings snow and strong winds to the East, including from the Boston metropolitan areas to Hartford and New York City, early this week. Travel in the region could be affected Tuesday as the storm moves quickly east.

(​MORE: Nor’easters explained)

This is where Lorraine is currently located: The storm is currently dropping snow over portions of the Plains and Ozarks, as the latest radar shows below. Rain and thunderstorms are spreading in the south.

Winter storm warnings are issued for the Northeast: The National Weather Service has raised winter storm warnings from southern New England to southeastern New York, northern New Jersey and central and northeastern Pennsylvania.

Depending on location, affected areas in the Northeast can expect a possible snowy Tuesday morning and/or afternoon. Flight delays are also possible at the major northeastern hubs on Tuesday.

It’s best to avoid traveling to locations where winter storm warnings are in effect until the storm subsides.

Here is the current timing for this winter storm: Lorraine will bring snow or a mix of rain and snow to portions of the Ozarks, Ohio Valley, Tennessee Valley and Appalachia through Monday night.

Snow or rain turning to snow will occur in the Northeast early Tuesday. Snowfall should impact travel in the Northeast for most of the day, while tapering off from west to east. Much of the storm’s snowfall will pass by Tuesday night.

In some areas, wind gusts of 30 to 40 mph could accompany the snowfall and reduce visibility. Tuesday afternoon’s high tide could also cause minor to moderate coastal flooding, from southern New England to the Mid-Atlantic coast. The Jersey Shore is particularly at risk of moderate coastal flooding.

This is how much snowfall can be expected: The map below shows our current snowfall forecast for the Northeast. Most areas from northeastern Pennsylvania to southeastern New York and southern New England can expect 5 to 12 inches, with locally higher totals possible. These include the metropolises of Boston, Hartford and Providence.

New York City should see at least 3 to 5 inches of snow. The total numbers here are still uncertain and depend on how quickly rain turns into snow. A faster transition to snow could increase totals to over 5 inches, while a slower transition could reduce totals. Regardless, the highest totals will be in the New York metro north and northwest of the city.

(192 hours: Optimize your forecast even further with our detailed, hour-by-hour breakdown for the next 8 days – only available on our website Premium Pro experience.)

Snow and rain forecast

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Snow drought in the northeast

It has been at least two weeks, if not longer, since the last snowfall in what has been another poor winter of snowfall across the Northeast.

Boston, New York City and Pittsburgh each have a season-to-date snowfall deficit of at least 15 inches through February 8th. New York’s 2.3 inches is just above the record low set a year ago, when only 0.4 inches had fallen.

The most breathtaking is typically snowy Syracuse, New York. Their total seasonal length of 28 inches sounds impressive, but is 55 inches – or over 4.5 feet – below their average pace. It is the lowest seasonal record in 91 years.

Seasonal snowfall (since fall) compared to previous season average for three northeastern cities through February 8, 2024.

(Data: NOAA/NWS; Graphics: Infogram)

The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science in our lives.

Source: weather.com

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Jennifer Adams

Dedicated news writer with a passion for truth and accuracy. Covering stories that impact lives.

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